Margarette Purvis and leading change at the Food Bank for NYC

by | Oct 5, 2018

Margarette Purvis @foodbank_prez

CEO, FOOD BANK FOR NEW YORK CITY 

It’s an absolute pleasure to be back with you. Today I’m a little bit excited, because today I get to speak with a woman who rocked my world a couple of years ago and has continued to rock my world in following all the work that she does. A couple of years ago, I was speaking at Agile Australia, and one of their keynotes was the rather impressive Margarette Purvis, who is the CEO of the New York Food Bank. Margarette had a really, really interesting case study to share around change transformation and her organization. She’s a repeat offender. People loved her so much, she came back again this year and had more wisdom to share.

 

IJen Frahm:   

It’s with very great pleasure that I introduce you to Margarette. Margarette, welcome to Conversations of Change.

Margarette Purvis:      

Thank you. Hello, Dr. Jen.

Jen Frahm:                     

Now, we could get into trouble on this call, so we’re going to keep focused for a little bit. To start with, I thought it’d be really helpful, because I’ve heard your story a couple of times. Can you share with the listeners a bit of context? What is the New York Food Bank? How big is it? Who do you serve? Just set up what it is that you lead.

Margarette Purvis:      

Yeah, so Food Bank for New York City is a citywide anti-hunger, anti-poverty organization. We serve 1.5 million New Yorkers. The people who turn to us are people who are struggling to afford food or who are struggling to gain access to healthy, nutritious food. They access the food that we provide through soup kitchens, which are charities that provide obviously a hot, prepared meal, and food pantry. At a food pantry, it’s a kind of organization where a family can go and actually find groceries, things from cereal, rice, to even fresh vegetables, frozen meats. It really runs the gamut.

There are close to a thousand, 1,000, of this charity that Food Bank for New York City serves. We deliver all of the food to them. We use volunteers to not only help us find great food that could go to waste, but we also use volunteers to help repack food that people have donated to us, to just make sure that we get the food that is actually able to be eaten or should be eaten, and make sure that we’re not passing things that really should not go any further. It’s a complicated distribution model and organization, but I tell you, it is a life’s joy, Jen, for sure.

Jen Frahm:                     

For sure. About how many employees and volunteers, or how many people do you have?

Margarette Purvis:      

Oh, well, we have about 200 full-time employees spread between four sites. We have four different locations around the city, but then we also … Oh my god, in any given year, we can have close to 18,000 volunteers, 18,000 to 20,000 volunteers who help us, who help us in just any given year.

The path to CEO 

 

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, that’s massive. Tell me, I’m really curious, and I know a little bit of this, but I don’t think we’ve actually had this chat in terms of what’s been your history? How did you get to be in this position where you are now CEO of one of the most high-impact charity organizations in America?

Margarette Purvis:      

Yeah. Well, I mean, I think my resume would probably point to all of these other charity jobs that I’ve had in the past where I’ve always worked in human services. But if it’s just between me and you, I would tell you that my career really, honest to God, started volunteering alongside my grandmother. My granny, she was what you call a Missionary Baptist. We’re from the South, from Mississippi, and my grandmother believed that faith, our faith to be a verb. She believed that the best way that you show your faith is through service to others.

  I apparently was the grandkid of her 31 grandchildren who agreed with her. I really liked serving beside her. I liked volunteering. She loved to feed people. She was like one of the best cooks ever, and I’m not just saying that because she’s my grandmother. But according to our preacher, who brought all the other preachers to our house on Sunday, she’s a really great cook. She just loved to cook for others. If we had anything, she would share it. She made sharing a value in our family.

But then I have to say, my grandfather on the other side, there’d be one argument I’d hear them saying all the time, Jen. She’d want to help people, and he would say things like, “Woman, you’re going to help us to the poorhouse.” He would always be the person of balance, like, “Wait a minute.” I think that from her, I learned this love of giving and sharing, but I think from him, I learned, “Okay, but career-wise, you’re going to need a trajectory.” I think I probably learned from him the idea of impact and the beauty of scale, and just making sure that whatever you’re going to do, let’s try to do it as smart as possible.

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, nice.

Margarette Purvis:      

So it was a combination of those two people.

On Toyota, Kaizen and Agile Australia 

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, fantastic, fantastic. You had a really, really interesting story. I think it was 2016 was your first visit to Agile Australia, or for those in the US, agile. Did I say it right, agile? You know how we pronounce it differently in Australia! 

Margarette Purvis:     

  I’ve been practicing. I’ve been practicing how to say agile, agile. I love the way you guys say it, but yeah, in America, it’s just agile.

Jen Frahm:                     

Oh, Agile Australia. You talked about how you had worked with Toyota to introduce Kaizen to the Food Bank. Can you share a little bit about how that came to light, so how did that come into your world, and what the outcomes were?

Margarette Purvis:      

Yes. Well, I think part of why people kind of really love our story is because we tell the truth. I mean, I think it’s so often when you’re looking at a partnership with a charity and a corporation that you only tell all the awesome parts. This is where it was, and then this is where it ended up.

I like to make sure that people understand that the power of our Toyota relationship is really in the mistake in how it got started, meaning that, yes, they were working with our charity, but there was like a year of the work where nobody really even knew it was happening, because there were employees who were working on it, but they hadn’t engaged leadership. Certainly for continuous improvement to happen, the leaders have got to be involved.

 One of my favorite things I always tell people is the real start happened when I learned that Toyota was not happy. I didn’t even know they really had been working with us, but I ran into one of the executives and he told me the truth. When I walked up, said, “Hey, how are things going?” and he says, “Not great,” and so of course, that got my attention. He proceeded to tell me that he felt that the company was working with our organization, and he thought it was going to be bigger and it wasn’t. That is what pulled me in and had me learn more.

We were off to the races from there, and I really saw … I actually had Toyota come in, and more than just start with stop clocks and stopwatches and charts, they gave us the history of Kaizen. They helped us to understand, Jen, where was the inspiration for continuous improvement? I was so glad that they did that, because it is so easy for people to get pigeonholed. You are a car manufacturer. We are a charity for the poor. But in learning the history, we got to see that our history was shared, and that at the heart of Kaizen was really about a son’s concern for his mother’s back. It was the concern that there had to be a way to not harm people, to not harm the person that he most loved.

 I tell you, I got chills watching that history, and that’s really where we saw the line. From there is where we started looking for all the different ways that we could use the best that Toyota offers to the world to embed in our mission, so that we could offer the best to the charities we serve and the families who are on those lines.

I tell you, we’re so fortunate to have so many gifts, but when a corporation shares their secret sauce with a human service organization, Jen, it is a generosity. It is a grace that you can hardly really explain the power of.

We just work really hard to honor it. We work very hard to not just make sure that we are running a great organization, but it’s very important to me to honor Toyota’s gift, because they didn’t have to do it.

Trends on corporate engagement with non-profits

Jen Frahm:                     

No, that’s such a fabulous story. I’m kind of curious around, what are the trends that you are seeing with how companies like Toyota engage with not-for-profits or nonprofits? Yeah, what’s kind of happening in that field?

Margarette Purvis:      

Well, you know what, it’s funny. Thank God for millennials. I think most corporations are seeing that they have got to have … A, they’ve got to do something, some work in the community. They have to, but not just so much, not just writing a check alone. Millennials want a tangible, real experience in community. I think that it is pushing leadership of companies to better connect, because people work so much. The work-life is a part of your life, and it is a significant part, and that people want the brand where they’re giving their talent to be in greater alignment with their heart and with their values. They want things where they can point to and say, “We did that.”

 We have actually found that probably the highest growth place where we’re having with our work with corporations is actually in custom service, where we sit with them, we explain to them the needs around the city, and we actually customize experiences where they can be the most helpful. It’s great for us, because I mean, boy, we are really getting an amazing, amazing lift to the mission, but we’re also seeing that our partners are just getting deeper involved.

They’re more real to us. It’s not just brand. We look at partners like Bank of America, like JPMorgan Chase, of all these brands that people certainly have heard of, but to us, it’s Connie, it’s Stephanie, it’s Nerita, it’s Jeff. Mind you, I’m telling you the president, the senior-most people, but to us, the names I just gave you, these are people who are actually chopping onions at my kitchen probably this week.

 More than just chopping onions, we now are seeing, now that they understand our meal gap map, something that we introduce where we look at hunger in degrees and we look at the communities that we know are suffering the most, and we ask these people to join us in partnership and strategy, and Jen, to watch them come at us saying hey, more than, “Hey, we just want to do something for Food Bank,” they’re now coming to us saying, “We saw the information on the South Bronx. We understand that one out of every two people is suffering with hunger and poverty. We would like to get meals to this neighborhood.” That never happened, I’m going to say, even up to two and a half, three years ago, Jen. That was not the way corporations spoke to us, and now it’s just … I don’t know. They feel more like a partner. It’s a really exciting time.

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, and I think so. If I understand it, the value for the corporate that you’re talking about there is being able to live their values, their corporate values, from their employee perspective.

Margarette Purvis:      

And retain their talent.

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, okay, so the value is also reaching the talent that’s important to them. Okay.

Margarette Purvis:

Yeah, absolutely.

On leading change and transformation 

Jen Frahm:                     

What does that then mean for you? I’m curious how you view your role as a leader of change and transformation.

Margarette Purvis:      

Yeah. Well, I think my role, number one, is get on top of it or expect to not be here long. I mean, the reality is that there’s just now … There’s a requirement for change, for you to have an appetite, for you to have a nimble disposition towards it. There’s a requirement for you to lead it and not allow it to happen to you. It’s just something at Food Bank that we openly embrace.

I will tell you, what I have learned over time, and it’s something that actually I credit Toyota with as well, is when you have embraced change and when you have been up to process improvement up to your eyeballs, that you also got to take a moment to pause.

 You have to pause and take a look, because sometimes you can be changing so many different parts that you also got to stop to say, “Why did we need to do this many changes? Is there something that is not as clear that may be more central to who we are as an organization, as a culture, to me as a leader, that I now need to look at? Is there something that just may not be as obvious?” I will tell you, that’s really where we are now. We now have been embracing this idea. We actually just had an all-staff retreat, and the theme was all about … We called it we are basically excellent, so at the end of the day, really about a theme of embracing the basics of excellence. We called out four things, four things that we consider to be the pillars for excellence for our organization.

The first one, the first thing, is to learn, then share, value, and improve, because one of the things that I started to become concerned about is that, when you have become known for the impact of improvement, you don’t want to end up with a culture or with an environment where new people coming in, or even old people, people who’ve been with you, where they don’t feel or believe that they can still learn, that there’s room for them to learn something new, learn from mistakes. We’ve been really very intentional about that, Jen. I’ll tell you, it’s not easy. It’s not easy, but it’s actually kind of fun. It’s keeping me on my toes, I’d tell you that much. Whoo, it really has. It really has.

Jen Frahm:                     

Well, that’s super. Hey, one of the sessions at this year’s Agile Australia, it was the second one, so not the keynote, but when you had the session where everybody came into the room and the more intimate conversation. You talked about making a point of not trimming the nails if the arm needs amputating, which I’d never heard. It kind of took me by surprise a little bit, and I just wondered, do you want to expand on that and what that saying means for you?

Margarette Purvis:      

Well, first, let me tell you, I get to talking so much, I’ll be the first to tell you I actually don’t remember saying that. It’s probably something I would have said, but I don’t remember. I actually don’t remember saying it, but I agree with it, so I must have said it. I just think that, listen, change can be hard. Your work family can be … It’s an intimate thing, and you form relationships. Sometimes you don’t know that you have a sacred cow. You can think you don’t have a sacred cow, and you do.

 I think as a leader, I certainly have learned that you’re there. If there’s going to be a tough choice or tough decision to make, it’s my job to make it. What you don’t want to do is to keep messing around and making the easy choice, Jen, when the reality can be that, you know what, we need a sea change. Sometimes it can be things like you could have a great person who may be in the wrong role, or it could be a role that you as a leader are taking on, and you should not, and you must stop it now. But it’s taking those hard looks.

 We have this saying at Food Bank where we … It’s like we got to keep each other honest by saying things like, “Food Bank first.” Food Bank first, for us, means it is not about your preference. It is not about what you like. It is about what is the best thing for this organization if you are honest. The fact that everyone has the ability to call Food Bank first card, it’s that moment that tells everybody, “Okay, stop, stop. Something is going out of order, and this person is showing love for our organization by bringing it to our attention.” That’s something that we’ve done, and let me tell you, it is not easy. It’s not easy. In fact, it’s quite hard.

It’s quite hard, but I have to tell you something. When we look at the impact, we always remind ourselves … One of the things that we did is we stopped counting pounds as our way to measure success. We started looking at meals and everything that we’re doing by how many more meals. Then we started going a little deeper to say where the meals went. Did the meals go to the poorest community, housing the poorest charity, serving the poorest people? That became our new metric for success. I think that, once we got that new lens, Jen, it made the hard decisions a little easier, because we realized this is how we’re serving our mission to the highest degree. 

Jen Frahm:                     

I’m interested in where I guess … You’re very open with sharing what the challenges are, right?

Margarette Purvis:  

   Yeah.

The change leaders pride

Jen Frahm:    

Tell me about what you’re most proudest of, what you celebrate in terms of your change leadership.

Margarette Purvis:

Yeah, you know what, this is so cool that you asked me this, because I just had this conversation with somebody. I did not know you were going to ask this. Actually just this week, probably one of my favorite things ever is when we get to promote someone. Jen, I can’t tell you, I mean, when you see a person who maybe they’ve started in one job, and you will see them go through this journey where they’re a person keeping us honest, they are a person who you see showing the way for others, and having them kind of take charge of who we are as an organization and calling it out with such passion, and seeing them gain the respect or earn the respect of their colleagues, I can’t tell you, it makes me so excited.

 I mean, just this week alone, there was a guy. There’s actually two young men. One person’s name is Jimmy, and another person’s name is Rafael. Both of them were guys who worked in our warehouse. One’s been with us for seven years. Another’s been with us for six years. They’re both fathers. They both were promoted this week. They’re now management. It’s their first time ever being in a manager’s job. We went through a whole … We created an actual management training program. We gave them plenty of time so they could practice things, so they could be able to fail and be able to reflect on that, and see what they’ve learned.

 I tell you, sitting with them today, and we’re kind of going over some welcome to management things, and I’m listening to their feedback, and one guy said to me, he said, “One of the best things that ever happened is that I didn’t get promoted earlier.” I said, “Wait, what?” He’s like, “Yeah, I thought I was ready.” He said, “I thought I was ready, but clearly I wasn’t.” He said, “I needed to work on myself. I needed to learn some new skills.” He said, “But now, I know I’m ready.”

 I tell you, I got goosebumps, Jen, because at the end of the day, listen, there’s so many wonderful things that happen at a food bank. There’s so many accomplishments that people will speak about and the pounds of food, and those are things we should absolutely be really, really proud of. But you don’t often get a chance to really share with people the heart palpitation you get from seeing a person accomplish something amazing, and knowing that they are pivotal to our mission and that they know that they’re pivotal, and watching them walk in that, oh my God, it’s like the best thing ever. It’s the best thing ever. It makes me giddy. It makes me giddy. It makes me proud. It really does.

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, that’s-

Margarette Purvis:

 There’s going to be another guy who’s going to be promoted too, but he … I can say it to you, because he’s not going to hear this podcast, but-

Jen Frahm:         

Does he know yet?

Margarette Purvis:

       … when he actually started at the Food Bank … No, he knows he’s on the path, but he started off as an intern. This guy is about to become a vice president at our organization. Yeah, it’s a good week. It’s a good week. It’s a good week.

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah. When we finish this call, you’re going to have to let me know timing of that, just in case he does listen to this podcast, and we’ll publish it after.

Margarette Purvis: 

Okay, good point. Yeah, good point, good point, good point.

Advice from a grandmother 

Jen Frahm:                     

Hey, here’s a scenario for you. You are going into a performance review, and you’re going into a performance review with pretty granny. We know that she has driven you the importance of faith as a verb. How would she advocate you improve as a leader of change?

Margarette Purvis:      

Well, you know what, actually I’m going to tell you, I really did get some real advice from my other grandmother, my Grandma Victoria. It was advice that she gave me when I first started the job, and I did not realize how powerful the advice was. It was as simple as … I told her. I said, “Grandma, I’m going to be moving to New York. I’m going to take this job. I’m going back to the organization I was before.” She’s like, “You’re going back to the same job?” I said, “No, ma’am. I was the vice president then. Now I’m going to go in as the CEO.”

 I said, “Do you have any advice for me?” I was kind of saying it jokingly. She looked at me. She says, “Well, you’re the boss now, right?” I said, “I will be the boss.” She said, “Be nice.” I kind of chuckled like, “Okay, grandma.” She looked at me. She says, “I’m not joking.” No, she did. She said, “Honey, you are the boss.” She said, “In that way, you’ve won.” She said, “But the best boss can still be nice.” I walked away, and let me tell you something, this particular grandma was actually not known to be nice. I took that in, which meant that that was a really heartfelt lesson of life that she learned. I’ve never forgotten it. I tell you that when you have to deliver really hard news or … No one wants to be a disappointment.

Jen Frahm:                     

No.

Margarette Purvis:      

No one wants to fail. I think one of the things that for me for change meant is that I have readily stated to my team, I try my best daily to demonstrate to my team, that failure is not the opposite of success. Failure is a part of success. Now, are we still wanting to be excellent, and we’re going to do our best job ever, or try always to do our best job? Of course, but you’ve got to leave room and appreciation for failure. I think it’s not even important for the person at the bottom to hear that. It’s important to me that my leaders get that, because I want to make sure that they are reflecting the same. I don’t want their own anxiety for the task within their area to create a bunch of stress and tension for the people who report to them.

 I try my best to use humor all the time. My COO and I, Lord have mercy, we can be so stressed, you have no idea, but we find a way to laugh every day. We will find something, even if no one else thinks it’s funny but us. That’s been something that’s been core to who I am and how I lead is that you got to have some levity. You got to have levity, and you got to have as much transparency as you can. I think that that’s something that whether it be my pretty granny or my Grandma Victoria, that they’d be pretty proud of. Yeah.

A leader who gets ‘social’ 

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, great stuff. Now in terms of the levity and the having the laugh every day, one of the things that I think distinguishes you from a lot of leaders is your activity on Instagram. I think, yeah, right? In particular, it’s not even a market for this Instagram account. It’s the CEO_FoodBank. We’ll publish it on the blog. But you do it in role, right?

Margarette Purvis:   

Yeah.

Jen Frahm:                     

Can you tell us a little bit about that, why that platform, what it is that … why you started doing it and what you have to gain with that?

Margarette Purvis:      

Well, okay, so yeah, the name is @foodbank_prez. I will say my Instagram presence is ever-evolving. I mean, there were times where everything was always policy this and policy that, but I definitely noticed that people connected more when I would just give glimpses of myself and just kind of who I am, because that’s how I lead.

I don’t ever want a title to separate me from whether it be the charities that we serve, those leaders, our volunteers, or even the families, you know? Everybody should be lucky enough to have a grandma. Every person should know the power of de-stressing by gardening.

Some things, like I do some cooking videos that I put on my stories, I don’t put those on the main page, because I have a bunch of chefs following me, and I don’t want to be corrected in front of everybody. Those videos are actually … Just between me and you, and all of your followers of course, I started putting cooking videos up because my baby sister let me know that she wants to get married. I didn’t know she wanted to get married. But in the midst of her saying, “I want a child, and I want a husband,” and I said, “Do you know how to cook?” She said, “No, I don’t.” I said, “Well, honey, you live in Mississippi. I don’t know any men from Mississippi who are looking for women who don’t cook anything.”

The videos started out as a joke of me kind of walking her through steps. We thought the videos were funny, because it’s always my music playlist and whatever I’m showing my sister how to cook. Suddenly it became a part of it. It’s just become something that’s just kind of fun, Jen, of just at the end of the day, we’re all people. We all take our shoes off one at a time, and if we’re lucky enough, we have some really good meals and good music.

Jen Frahm:                     

That’s funny

Margarette Purvis:      

You have some pretty good culinary videos too, sister. I’ve seen some of the things there. Whoa, you have a mean dinner party.

Jen Frahm:                     

Yeah, cooking is my passion. That’s how I express my love for people. That is my zen space, when I can get into a really complicated menu. Next time you’re back in Australia and in Melbourne, we’ll do a foodbank_prez special dinner party. How about that?

Margarette Purvis:      

Ooh, I would love that, because let me tell you something, you had a party soon after I left. I’m like, “What am I, chopped liver? She didn’t have the party when I was there.” It was beautiful. I would love that. I would love it. I would.

Jen Frahm:                     

Hey, speaking of-

Margarette Purvis:      

I love Australia, by the way. I love Australia. Oh my gosh, I really enjoyed everybody. I miss all of my Cuzzy Bros.

On using your super powers for good 

 

Jen Frahm:                     

Your Cuzzy Bros. That’s a quick shout-out. One of the wonderful things that you achieved in your visit was you inspired other people to use their superpowers for good. Do you want to give a quick shout-out to the people who went on to do their own work with charities?

Margarette Purvis:      

Oh my, yes, I would. Let me tell you, probably one of my favorite things the whole time I was there was the number of people who walked up to me … I tried to put it on my Instagram, so you can go back. Anybody can go back to foodbank_prez. It was so awesome watching the number of people who came by to tell me all the different charities that they adopted. People were telling me … I think there was one young lady. She was a doctor. She’s actually going to be going back to … She’s from India. She’s going back to India, and she’s going to be starting a charity there.

I think I was almost a little overwhelmed. I did not expect to have that many people have such wonderful examples of things that they did. There was one gentleman, and he actually emailed me before I came back to Australia to tell me all about the work he was doing with OzHarvest. I got to visit them, and oh, let me tell you, every Australian should really be so proud of the work that’s being done by OzHarvest. They really are a wonderful organization. I was able to go in and sample the food, it was so delicious, and see their different models.

Let me tell you, I actually think that, and I don’t even know that I’ve had a chance to tell them this, I’ll say it to you, the visit to OzHarvest changed my organization. Yeah, yeah, yeah. We were having a conversation, and I made a comment about money that we saved at my soup kitchen. I was so proud about it, Jen. I watched one of their leaders. He kind of had this look on his face. You know me. I like to just call it out. I was like, “Whoa, you just judged me. What was that about?” He’s like, “Oh, no, no, no. I didn’t judge you.” I said, “Yes, you did. Why did you judge me? What’s going on?” He said, “Well, I’m sitting here thinking, why are you spending money on food? Why don’t you just cook what you have?”

 It sounds like such a simple, simple thing, but I looked at him and I said, “Cook what I have. Why am I not cooking what I have?” No, really, I called my team members. I don’t even remember what time it was there. I called my team members from OzHarvest. I said, “I think I just heard something revolutionary that may be a message to us from God, and we’re going to change how we’re doing things at that kitchen.” Let me tell you, we’re no longer spending money on food at our kitchen. We cook what we have, and we’ve been saying to even food donors, “We don’t have enough food. Give us more, so we can cook what we have.” It’s become a rallying call in just a couple of months. I’m very grateful to OzHarvest and to our friends in Australia. It’s a big deal, and we don’t take that feedback lightly.

Jen Frahm:                     

That’s wonderful. All right. All good things must come to a temporary end. As a way of wrapping this up, Margarette, how can our listeners help you? How can our listeners give back for all the tremendous work you have given to others?

Margarette Purvis:      

Well, I think the first thing anybody could do is, if there’s anything that you’ve heard me say that inspires you or makes you curious, you need to pursue that. Everybody can be helpful to the most vulnerable in your community. The first thing that’s required is to see them. If you can just be willing to see the most vulnerable and choose to do anything, that would make me the most proud, and I think that’d be the most helpful. If you’re coming to America, come on by New York City and visit us. If you want to send a long-distance dollar, we certainly will receive it, foodbanknyc.org, or look, we can always be invited to come back to Australia. I love it so much.

But in all seriousness, there’s nothing, there’s nothing that probably moves us more than to hear that people took something from our story, Jen, and decided to act locally and decided to be of help to another charity, because let me tell you, people who know change management, people who know agile, people who know how to make a process better, smarter, faster, you are needed, and you are needed where people are the most vulnerable.

Anything that you want to share with our global community is just a beautiful gift. 

Jen Frahm:                     

Well, that sounds fabulous. I can let you know that about 35% of the audience of this podcast are actually American, so they may not be long-distance

Margarette Purvis:      

Woo-hoo.

Jen Frahm:                     

Right?

Margarette Purvis:     

Oh, we love that.

Jen Frahm:                     

It would make it a little bit easier for those.

Margarette Purvis:      

Well, then come visit our site, foodbanknyc.org.

Jen Frahm:                      Absolutely, absolutely. For those who are looking for an A-class speaker as a keynote at your conference, and I imagine whilst Margarette has shared her story on Kaizen and Toyota, what you’ve heard in this podcast is she has so much wisdom that she can impart in such a wonderfully engaging way. You won’t get a better keynote speaker for your conference-

Margarette Purvis:      

Oh, thank you.

Jen Frahm:                     

… wherever you are in the world, wherever.

Margarette Purvis:      

Thank you, Jen.

Jen Frahm                     

Okay then. I’m going to wrap this one up. Leaders, listeners, if you have enjoyed this, I would really encourage you to share it widely. Whether that means going to iTunes, leaving a review so others can find it, or share it on LinkedIn, Twitter, even your internal platforms, I would encourage you to do that, so more people can get the goodness of Margarette Purvis. Margarette, thank you so much for your time. This has been beyond an honor to speak with you.

Margarette Purvis:      

Thank you for having us, Jen. You know you are my sister from another mister.

 

 

 

CONTACT

A change management Jiminy Cricket, sitting on your shoulder coaching you on the way forward. I know you’re capable of greatness. So drop me a line.

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